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Local Filmmaker Premieres New Film at Tribeca Film Festival

Cody Blue Snider’s latest film is “Fool’s Day.”

Filmmaker Cody Blue Snider (Photo Credit: Nick Sambides Jr.)
Filmmaker Cody Blue Snider (Photo Credit: Nick Sambides Jr.)
Thugs jumped him, took his phone, and tried to take his wallet. But more importantly, they didn’t get his movie.

That’s what happened to local filmmaker Cody Blue Snider the night he wrapped up his new film, “Fool’s Day,” at a studio in New York City a couple of weeks ago. He had just finished the conversion of the final film into the digital format required for screenings and had the hard drive in his backpack.

“Have you ever had anything that doesn’t feel real? You go into autopilot,” Snider said in an interview with Patch. “I was just glad I didn’t get stabbed.”

“Fool’s Day” is Snider’s second film, following “All That Remains” (2011), which the Three Village community saw at the Stony Brook Film Festival that year. “Fool’s Day” made its world premiere on April 18 at the TriBeCa Film Festival – and will be screened at the Cannes Film Festival later this year.

Snider said he is incredibly excited to be screening at both festivals, but hasn’t let the success go to his head.

“It’s the most satisfied I’ve ever been with a project of mine,” he said. “Still, there’s so much room for improvement. At this point I can look at it and I can be happy because the essence of it is there.”

“Fool’s Day” tells the story of a mischievous class of elementary school kids who play a trick on their teacher. We’ll just tell you the film’s tagline – “Murder. Mayhem. Recess.” – and not much more, lest we spoil the film for you. View the trailer here. The film is co-written by Cody Blue Snider and his brother Shane Snider, both sons of rock star Dee Snider.

Snider and his crew turned to Kickstarter.com to raise more than $10,000 needed to make the film, which they shot in one week with one camera before spending nearly a full year editing.

He said he is on his third draft for a feature-length version of “Fool’s Day.” Sometimes, he said, short films get made into features because they portray enough of the filmmaker’s vision to prove to studios and producers that they are worth it. “Sling Blade” (1996), the brainchild of Billy Bob Thornton, is one example.

“You can use that launch pad to make a feature,” Snider said, “because you can’t show them your passion. You can’t show them what’s in your head.”

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